International Student Services

The International Student Services (ISS) office supports the academic and personal well-being of international students and language scholars at Reed College.

ISS collaborates with other campus departments to provide resources and programs that help international students and scholars acclimate to life in the U.S. and thrive at Reed, while also facilitating their ability to share their diverse cultures with the rest of the college community.

Like us on Facebook!
Recent Tweets @
Posts I Like

What did you do during Fall Break? The ISS office went to Seattle. Click through some of the moments we captured from our one day adventure. We hope you all had a wonderful week! 

Last Thursday night, the Diwali + Eid Festival livened up the Student Union with the aroma of a delicious South Asian meal, laughter and catchy music, and students admiring their newly adorned henna tattoos. The night ended with a spontaneous dance party and smiles all around.

Special thanks to RASA (Reed Association for South Asia) for their help in making this event possible.

Check out the pictures from this night on the ISS Facebook page, and don’t forget to “Like” us!

Last night, InterConnect mentors and mentees bonded during their first off-campus event, dining at the Belmont food carts.

To see more pictures, check out the ISS Facebook Page and remember to “Like” us to stay updated!

Week 3 at Reed is already coming to an end… Revisit the excitement of O Week through the ISS Facebook Page and “Like” us to stay updated on upcoming events!

is almost upon us! So now’s the time to connect with the office 
(ISS@reed.edu), your host family, or your InterConnect mentor (if you signed up for InterConnect) to get all of your questions answered. Hope you’re as excited about coming to Reed as we are to have to you! 

Happy Packing! 

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part II: Midnight Premiere

This is a fun little “trailer” the alumni office created to advertise the centennial reunions. Enjoy! 

This week the whole campus is abuzz with the Centennial Reunions. Yep, our little college has just about made it through 100 years (1911-2011). Lots of events are being planned as alumni from all over the globe come back to campus to celebrate their alma mater, and with lectures, music, dancing, dining, a carnival, and a talk by Gary Snyder ‘51 all planned, this promises to be a busy week of Reed pride. So here’s to the next 100! 

I spent a big chunk of this past academic year working on my thesis, as do all seniors at Reed. I studied linguistics here and, when fall semester approached, I knew I wanted to focus on syntax, but I struggled with finding a topic that I really wanted to devote my year to. After much debating, I finally settled on a topic in November—some would say this is kind of late in the game but in the end I was fine. Ergativity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergative–absolutive_language) was one of the topics I was interested in, because I find it fascinating, and I was taking a field methods class, in which we were studying Amdo Tibetan. Tibetan languages are known to have the ergative alignment system, so I decided to study the phenomenon of ergativity in Amdo Tibetan. My advisor suggested that I compare this to the ergative alignment in Lhasa Tibetan, a more widely studied and documented language variety. So that’s what I ended up writing my thesis on. I studied the case-marking structure of two different dialects of Tibetan, described them, and compared them using formal linguistics. The part I enjoyed the most in my thesis process was doing the fieldwork to gather data in Amdo Tibetan. I got to work with a fellow international student who is from Tibet. I would sit with him every week or every other week and collect sentences in Amdo Tibetan to help me analyze its structure.

When I started the writing process, I went straight to LaTeX (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaTeX). I had been using MS Word for the entirety of my life, but I had practiced using LaTeX with some of my assignments earlier in the year, because I knew I wanted to write my thesis in it. And boy, am I glad I did that. Not only did my thesis look so good thanks to the formatting options LaTeX offers, it made my life so much easier, because there are linguistics-specific packages that saved so much time for things like interlinear glossing. I strongly encourage all seniors to use LaTeX.

Well, I spent many late nights in the library, writing and editing my thesis until it was in a form that I was happy with. And I ended up turning it in two days early. After numerous drafts and changing the order of chapters around last minute, I was ready to print a final draft of my thesis to submit it. I excitedly printed a copy of it, went to my advisor for his approval, made four copies for my orals board, got my advisor’s signature, and went to the registrar’s office. I showed them the final product, and they congratulated me and gave me my laurels, which I am wearing in the picture. I felt so free and so accomplished at the same time. In the next week, I defended my thesis in front of four members of my orals board. I made some final changes to the thesis and it was ready to be printed and bound for the library. I did this the very next day after the oral defense and avoided the lines. Copies of my thesis were submitted to the library that same day.

I really enjoyed the thesis process, even though there were some tough moments. If I had to do my undergraduate education all over again, I would definitely choose an option that involves writing a thesis. But for now, I’m ready for graduation…!

-Jinyoung Park ‘11

This is the video we made for the ISS Renn Fayre softball team: The League of Extraordinary Nations. Renn Fayre is a weekend long celebration of seniors completing their theses at the end of the spring semester. This was the first year ISS participated in the softball tournament with a team. We fared quite well, qualifying to the quarter-finals after crushing the competition. Join us next Renn Fayre and help us win!

Cris Panda ‘12 & Mischka Moechtar ‘12